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Our Lady of Victory / St. Malachy
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FIRST SUNDAY

OF

ADVENT

Our Lady of Victory
Sunday - 9:00 A.M.
CELEBRATION OF THE EUCHARIST St. Malachy
Saturday - 7:00 P.M.


F O O D   F O R   T H O U G H T

Reading I Isaiah 2. 1 - 5 Responsorial Psalm Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord.
Reading II Romans 13, 11 - 14 Gospel Matthew 24, 37 - 44
Food for Thought
  • “Salvation is nearer to us now than when we became believers”. It is a powerful connection that Paul makes, because we believe in Jesus and a sense of urgency is how we live and what we do.
  • Has my belief in Jesus really changed me? Have I allowed it to change me?
  • Do I fend change off, moving it to “another day”?

December 2nd, 2007


Pastor
Rectory
490 Charles Street
Gatineau, Québec J8L 2K5
Secretary
Monday and Thursday - 1:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday and Wednesday - 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.
Email
Telephone
(819) 986-3763
Fax
(819) 961-3159

ARE YOU NEW TO OUR PARISH? WELCOME!
Welcome to those who want to make our parish their faith home. You may have come from other places. You may have been “away for a while”. Be assured that we love to have you among us. We would appreciate it very much if you identified yourself at Mass. It would also help if you would take the time to fill out a registration form. The next time you are with us, you may leave it in the collection basket or give it to one of the ushers or to the priest. Thank you and welcome.


M A S S       S C H E D U L E

SAT. Dec. 08th - 7:00 p.m. St. Malachy All Parishioners of St. Malachy & OLV
SUN. Dec. 09th - 9:00 a.m. OLV Peter Lawlis by Eric Ryan
Louis Weatherdon by Charlie & Karen Lawlor & family
Margaret Dorion by OLV Society


FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT – YEAR ‘A’

WAKE UP

This is the first Sunday of Advent, the beginning of a new year for the Church. We are invited by St. Paul to wake up (Rm 13:11), put on Jesus (v.14) and walk in His light (v.12). St. Matthew, in turn, tells us to stay awake (Mt.24: 42).

We have this marvelous opportunity every year, in the Church, to start afresh on a brand new page, a clean slate; it is called Advent. We can resolve to see things and people through the eyes of Jesus; act and react towards people and events as Jesus might. Thus, as Ps. 122 says, we can go rejoicing towards God’s house. Such is the mood of Advent: a joyful new resolve because we know that indeed our Master and Lord is coming!

The alarm clock is ringing; the sun (Son) is rising!

WE BEGIN THE ADVENT SEASON
This year, we will be reflecting on the readings that we hear each Sunday of the Advent season. Hopefully we can hang onto some of the words each week, really making a conscience effort to focus on the meaning and intent of this ‘pre-Christmas’ time. If the coming of Christ (not of Santa) is the focus for us as Christians, then we need to be aware of what Jesus Christ has come for and, in many ways, still needs to come for: A world that cries out for justice, for peace, for light – the Christian terms for redemption. That is the reason why you will find these weekly reflections, the images displayed in the Church, and the insert in this week’s bulletin. And there is always the Food for the week reflections on the front of the bulletin too!


REFLECTING ON THE SEASON OF ADVENT

Yes, Christmas is coming. However, the Church goes about it in a different way compared to the commercial and entertainment world all around us. The Church prepares for Christmas by observing the Advent season. That is not easy; it goes a bit against the grain. And yet, a proper observance of Advent may well be the most effective way of maintaining the specifically Christian meaning of Christmas.

We Christians hold a great festival during the winter solstice, the shortest days of the year. We call this festival “Christmas,” meaning the “feast of Christ.” It takes several weeks to prepare and several weeks to celebrate.

The weeks of preparation are called Advent - the season of growing darkness before the solstice. The weeks of celebration are called Christmastime - the season of growing light after the solstice. Perhaps it comes down to something basic: We are children of light.

We need Advent. Without it we stop being what we are: a people who are waiting. We need the gospel’s terrifying announcement of the end of time. We need the prophet’s consolations and threats. We learn who we are in the uneasy raving of John the Baptist and in the gentle strength of Holy Mary.

And we need Christmastime. We need a festival that runs beyond a single day, beyond a single week. We need time to tell about the journey of the Magi, about the embrace of old Simeon and Anna, about the babbling of water made wine and the leaping Jordan and that glorious voice thundering what we yearn to hear: You are my beloved child!

In the days of Christmastime we shout loud and clear that Jesus Christ is born. The reign of God is here among us, in our own flesh and blood. That’s why we gather around the star-topped tree of life and tinsel our homes in silver and gold, and spread our tables with the bounty of the harvest. The marvels of Christmas are signs of God’s reign, sings of life that conquers death, of “the light shining on in darkness, a darkness that did not overcome it” (John 1:5)

Of course, Advent cannot exist if we jump the gun on Christmas. And Christmastime cannot exist if we are already tired of it by December 25. These two seasons require each other. Only after the silence of Advent can the carols of Christmastime spring. Only after Advent’s darkness can a single star give so much cheer. Only after Advent’s terror can an angel be heard, once again, telling us to “fear not.” Year after year, we so genuinely need these seasons as rehearsal for heaven.

This festival of the winter solstice - this “feast of Christ” - does more than lead us from one year to another. In the power of Christ, Advent and Christmastime lead us from time into eternity.




Advent Prayer

Lord Jesus,

Master of both the Light and the darkness, send your Holy Spirit upon our preparations for Christmas

We who have so much to do seek quiet spaces to hear your voice each day.

We who are anxious over many things look forward to your coming among us.

We who are blessed in so many ways long for the complete joy of your kingdom.

We whose hearts are heavy seek the joy of your presence

We are your people, walking in darkness, yet seeking the light.

To you we say, “Come, Lord Jesus!”

THE NEW LIVING WITH CHRIST SUNDAY MISSALS - BETTER AT HOME THAN AT CHURCH
The better and more useful place for the Living With Christ Sunday Missals is the home. If we keep them in the church, then most of us will only see them for that one hour on Sunday. At home we can take a look at next Sunday’s Scripture readings or we can take a second look at last Sunday’s Scripture readings. Moreover, the Sunday Missals contain a good selection of prayers that may come in handy at various times. So we encourage that you buy one ($6.00) and use it at home.

IT MATTERS WHAT WE SING - THE THREE COMINGS OF CHRIST
Three comings of Christ? Well, yes. When we light the Advent candle at the beginning of Mass we sing: Kyrie eleison… The verses that go with that are very important. They help us focus on the three-fold coming of Christ, a basic tenet of the Christian faith:

  1. Past: The first verse speaks of the first coming of Christ which took place some 2000 years ago and which we celebrate at Christmas: “Lord Jesus, you came to gather the nations in the peace of God’s Kingdom.”


  2. Present: The second verse speaks of the present coming of Christ which in faith we are privileged to experience every time the word is proclaimed and a sacrament is celebrated (especially in Baptism and in Eucharist): “You come in word and sacrament to strengthen us in holiness.”; and


  3. Future: The third verse speaks to Christ’s coming in glory which is joy-filled hope we look forward: “You will come in glory with salvation for your people.”
You are also invited to use hymn around your Advent wreath at home….We would not want the observance of Advent to be limited to what we do or see or sing at Church. Let us make an effort to observe Advent at home too.

AND WHILE WE’RE AT IT, WHAT DOES MARANATHA MEAN ANYWAYS?
We sing “Maranatha, Come Lord Jesus Come” as our response to the Intercessions (or Prayers of the Faithful). This word is mentioned in the New Testament (1 Cor. 16:22) and consists of two Aramean words (the language that Jesus is thought to have spoken), Maran'athah, meaning, "our Lord comes," or is "coming."

OLV WARDENS MEETING
The next meeting will be on Wednesday, December 5th, at 7:00 p.m.

OLV WARDEN NOMINATIONS
The deadline for nominations for Wardens is December 9th. To date, no nominations have been received. Nominations for two wardens are urgently required. Please contact one of the wardens or the rectory at 986-3763.

CHRISTMAS CONCERT - THE CHANTERELLE CHOIR
There will be a Christmas Concert performed by The Chanterelle on December 19th, in the OLV Church hall at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $10.00 for Adults and $5:00 for children 6 – 12. Children under 5, free.

PRAYERS AND SYMPATHY
- to the family of Earl Roos whose funeral took place this week.



MASS SCHEDULE FOR CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR’S

Date Time Place

Dec. 24th, Monday 6:45 PM OLV
Dec. 24th, Monday 9:00 PM St. Malachy
Dec. 25th, Tuesday 9:00 AM OLV
Dec. 31th, Monday 7:00 PM St. Malachy
Jan. 01st, Tuesday 9:00 AM OLV

The usual weekend mass schedule remains

OFFICE HOURS
Monday and Thursday:   1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday and Wednesday:   9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

Telephone messages are picked up on a regular basis throughout the week.

If you have any items for the bulletin, please send them to Alma before Wednesday afternoon
or email Gale directly by end of day Wednesday: galeandreggie@videotron.ca.


W E E K L Y     R E C E I P T S
  Date Collection OLV St. Malachy

     Nov. 25 Sunday $   518.00    $   299.00   
     Nov. 25 Fuel    499.00       175.00   


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490 Charles Street • Gatineau • Québec • J8L 2K5
Telephone: (819) 986-3763
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